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-president of candidates exchanged verbal blows in the u.s. presidential race. across europe this friday, there is collation and disbelief. the european union has won the nobel peace prize. >> most leaders are bogged down in efforts to deal with the eurozone debt crisis. >> there was a spontaneous and unprecedented round of applause. >> one i woke up, i did not expected to be such a good day. we received the news of the award of the global peace prize. >> it came as a surprise to many in brussels on rent for its historic role in honoring the continent. >> they have helped to transform most of europe from a continental or continental peace. >> the president of the european parliament's interrupted the business to to vienna to respond. >> for me, this is also a personal thing. everything i have worked for, all the energy into pushing this forward has been honored today. >> there was a last-minute change to the schedule. currently in finland ahead of the european council summit, the finnish prime minister played down the importance of the eu's achievement. >> we had the two world wars. the
unity with a passionate call for europe to come together. >> in syria, 31 people are killed after a series of car bombs target government forces in aleppo. >> the u.s. revs up what europe stalls. -- while europe's tallest. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- it is the day the people of germany celebrate the unity. 22 years ago, east and west reunited with the blessing of their european neighbors. now there has been a pill to draw the right lessons in the crisis europe faces. >> the president of the parliament says his country must strive for greater unity in europe and he warned against perverting -- reverting to old national rivalries as the weaker members of the eurozone struggle. >> the speech in munich is the center of the celebration. >> the ceremony began with music from richard strauss's opera. more than 1500 people attended the ceremony, including germany's top political leaders. the bavarian state premier compared the process of german unification to that of creating a united europe. then he gave the keynote address. >> we are german european
role in transforming most of europe from a continent of war to a continent of peace. european nations formed the eu in 1993, building on the european economic community or eec established in 1958. nobel prize representatives note the eu is currently undergoing economic difficulties and social unrest. but they say they want to focus on the bloc's successes. the award appears aimed at encouraging member nations to work together to overcome their challenges. the eu's top official who was in tokyo to attend the imf/world bank meetings spoke to nhk. >> we have challenges for the moment in europe, but, it is indeed a happy day for europe and i trust for the world. >> european commission president jose manuel barroso welcomed the news. he said the award is a great honor for the citizens of europe, all member states, and european institutions. >> it is justified recognition for any project that works for the benefit of its citizens and also for the benefit of the world. >> barroso said the award shows that the eu remains an inspiration for countries and people all over the world. he said the
over the united states, europe -- >> in a stunning comeback over the united states, europe clinched the ryder cup. >> georgia could be set for a post-election standoff. both the ruling party and opposition coalition are claiming victory. >> the former soviet republic has claimed that exit polls give the opposition an edge, but the government claims it will retain its majority. >> opposition supporters have taken to the streets to celebrate victory. georgians went to the polls against a backdrop of prison abuse, a scandal that has damaged the once-popular government of mikhail saakashvili. his name rivals -- his main rival was to move the country into russia. it is not clear when the outcome will be known. let's go live to our reporter following the ballot in georgia. some confusion about the outcome, with both major groups claiming victory. do you have any further details? >> these elections have been a close race from the beginning. what we now hear from tbilisi, is that these elections obviously have turned out to become a victory for the opposition. the opposition -- the ballots
. the united states most talented people work longer hours while their counterparts in europe and japan work fewer hours. the rest of the economy as people have grown richer they've had a reduction in the amount of work that they've done. so that's one of the things that's happened, keeping up with the joneses if you will. that work effort and the risk-taking that it represents creates companies like google and facebook in countless of other companies, innovations that we have enjoyed in the united states more than in europe and japan. and that creates valuable on the job training for our most talented workers. and so again you get the training and increases your probability for success, you have a network of engineers, business people who are familiar with what's going to be successful in the internet, for example. that has a magnifying payoff, increases the probability for risk-taking. and the third is that success puts equity and as a people are willing to underwrite the risk that produces innovation him at those three things compound and gradually build over time. and we end up with an e
with anything better in europe. any normal person wants the best. if you could name me something better than europe, i will happily change direction. >> ivanishvili says politics are not his passion. he wants to put the country on the right path and then withdraw from politics. some have their doubts. >> he keeps saying he just wants to stay in power for two or two and a half years and then hand over power to his peop. maybe it is his way of showing power is not all that important. it is part of his idea of doing good. it is those do-gooder's who are very dangerous. >> back in his home village, ivanishvili has done quite a lot of good. in rural georgia, he built a modern wedding venue where local people can hold family celebrations for free. he paid for the school to be modernized. and a swimming pool to be built. since he entered politics, the pool has been dry. he used to pay for the water. and the government refused to accept any money from political rivals. that is also why the new health clinic has not opened yet. its director shows us the cardiology wing. he says it is unique in georgi
the european parliament pose a prestigious human rights award. for one of europe's most colorful and -- one of europe's most colorful and controversial politicians has been sentenced to prison for tax fraud. >> a court in milan has convicted former prime minister berlusconi of defrauding the italian government of millions of yours in unpaid taxes. remedy court gave him a four- year term and said berlusconi had shown a natural capacity for crime. berlusconi's lawyers condemned the verdict and promised to appeal. >> berlusconi has dominated italian politics for nearly 20 years, perhaps in anticipation of the jail term. earlier this week, berlusconi said he would not contest the next election. although given a four-year sentence, and was immediately reduced to one year due to an amnesty law from 2006. berlusconi was also fined 10 million euros and then form -- from holding public office for 10 years. the head of the media said television empire was accused of running a complex tax evasion system in the 1990's. prosecutors said berlusconi was part of a scheme to purchase broadcast rights to fil
time to get into europe. there's a lot of opportunity. liz: we will tell you what drove the markets with that data download. mixed day on wall street. lost momentum in the last hour of trading. the s and p got finis gains but snapping a four game losing streak. energy and financial baton performing sector was telecom and consumer discretionary had trouble and struggles and corn prices surging. official u.s. forecast usda report for the harvest and the usda forecast dropped 13% compared to a year ago. that was bullish for prices. weekly jobless claims fell 30,000 to seasonally adjusted 339,000. the report is questionable. may not be as positive as the sharp drop in the case. numbers raise questions after investors call that a statistical fluke. labor department saying no state is to blame for the decline but questions whether california's numbers were weighing in on this remain. dave: all the details are yet to come. larry is in the pitssof the cme. peter will tell us why. tied for the u.s. to avoid a recession giving certain circumstances and scott fries says to avoid technology. we
finance minister pushes europe-wide changes that would give brussels sweeping powers over national budgets. >> and a different perspective -- the soccer photos of a non- fan. the men charged with being one of the organizers of the ethnic cleansing of muslims and croatians in bosnia in the 1990's has started his defense at the hague proceedings by saying he did all he could to avoid war. >> a united nations court charges former bosnian serb leader radovan karadzic with the deaths of thousands. he faces life in prison if found guilty. >> he remained unrepentant as he began his defense. the former bosnian serb leader rejected the war crimes charges against him. >> instead of being accused for the events in the war, i should have been rewarded for all the good things i've done because i did everything humanly possible to avoid the war and to reduce the suffering of civilians. >> the united nations court in the hague will hear his answer to a long list of atrocities in the former yugoslavia. 300 hours are allotted for his defense. the 67-year-old is representing himself and plans to call hundre
of the world. so she's urging policymakers in europe to act now. legarde encouraged them to follow through with plans to create a banking union. then she turned her attention to the friction between japan and south korea over territorial issues. she's calling on leaders from both countries now to patch up their relationship. she said it's critical for asian economies and for the global economy. japan of course locked in another territorial dispute with china. some chinese delegates as we know have stayed away from these meetings. legarde said they're missing out on a great opportunity. she says she hopes the problems between the two however long-standing could be resolved. the head of the world bank says the uncertainties in countries that we've been talking about are leading people in developing nations more vulnerable. kim jung in says it's making things worse. >> increasing food prices often force the poorest families to make terrible choices. either feed my children or send the girls to school. you have to choice one or the other. >> kim went on to say he and his colleagues stand ready
was to prevent further conflict in europe. focusing initiatives on france and germany. >> today war between germany and france is unthinkable. this shows a well maintained effort and confidence that former foes can become close partners. >> what's now known as the european union expanded rapidly. the fall of the berlin wall led to eastern europe's country joining. and it was something the european commission president also focused on today when he gave his reaction to the award. >> european union was able in six countries to reunite almost all european continents. freedom, democracy. rule of law and respect for human rights are the ones that people all over the world aspire to. >> but the e.u. has won the peace prize in the midst of an acute financial crisis which has led to violent demonstrations in greece and spain. in europe, all divisions are reopening. perhaps that's why the european -- the nobel committee wants to boost it, prevent it from fragmenting. >> well, it's turned up a lot of discussion. we'll be going to the self-appointed capital of the e.u., brussels in a moment. first of
. germany is opposing the deal. >> lack of action from europe could risk pushing the global economy back into recession. >> you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you big news from around the globe. >>> welcome. "worldwide exchange" exchange. it's hump day. >> yes, it is. although it's been a shorter week for me. doesn't quite work that day. i guess i'm already over the hump. >> plenty coming up on today's program. >> indeed. let's take a look at where we'll be going around the world. >> won't attend imf meetings there as tensions between the two countries intensify. the u.s. government suing the nation's biggest mortgage lender. we'll take a look at how the global industry is faring. then it's off to paris. the stricken car maker is downgraded by moody's a day after demonstrators stage protests. we'll have details from the french capital. and we'll head to new york where there's an appetite for young, profits that is, up nearly a quarter from a year earlier. we'll take a look on a big day for earnings on wall street. and a big week that's coming up. joining us now onset, though,
in the campaign. tonight's missing issue is europe's debt crisis. >> brown: an ancient and historic city at risk in a modern-day civil war. we look at the destruction in aleppo, syria. >> this is one of the great tragedies. aleppo's an extraordinary cross roads of cultures, religions, all built on a strata of centuries of -- >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a 19th century recording made on tinfoil by thomas edison, digitally converted so we can hear it. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow starts today. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing supp
. mark phillips on the financial crisis in europe. it's so bad in spain some people are forced to do their shopping in the trash. charlie d'agata in afghanistan where american troops are on the lookout for enemies among their afghan allies. >> every soldier is required to carry their weapon with them at all times. and an ingenious idea for helping the poor inspired by his mother. >> i'm hoping my mother is watching and that she is enjoying this. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening, election someday five weeks from today but many of the states are getting a head start. today voters in ohio-- one of the key battleground states that will tip the balance on which way this election goes-- began casting their ballots. that brings to eight the number of states where voting is already under way. 34 states in all will begin voting before november 6. the latest preelection polling in ohio-- the second-biggest battleground state-- shows president obama with a ten-point lead over mitt romney, 53% to 43%. dean reynolds is in the bu
and more sinti -- >> more and more sinti and roma are coming to eastern europe, and they are largely fleeing politician. they say attested german politicians today will be how they treat these new arrivals. >> our correspondent was at the memorial ceremony. we asked him how survivors felt about today's proceedings, coming almost 70 years after the end of the second world war. >> my personal abiding memory of what has been a very important day will be conversation with one of the survivors who gave very moving address here in berlin today. one spoke to him personally, he told about when he was 7 years old and when and how his family at the time in the netherlands, which is where he grew up, were taken down to the local railway station to be put on a train to be taken to auschwitz where the vast majority of his family actually perished. he was at an area of the platform where there was a dutch policeman who saw him together with some of his family members, and he saidcen -- he said, "is g to be another train passing through, and when i lift my hat, you will run and get on that train an
being a key architect of one of the worst atrocities committed in europe since the second world war. now it was his turn to have his say. he offers a dramatically different portrait of his role. >> instead of being accused of the events in our civil war, i should of been rewarded for all the good things i've done, namely that i did everything in human power to avoid the war, that i succeeded in reducing the suffering of all civilians and the number of victims in our war was 3 times less than the numbers reported in the public. >> he was leader of the bosnian serbs when the country was torn apart by conflicts. forces loyal to him were accused of ethnic cleansing, a devastated seed and the shelling of the capital sarajevo, and the massacre of 7000 bosnian men and boys, muslims. he was a fugitive practicing alternative medicine until he was arrested in 2008. now he has laid out the themes of his defense, but he was a mild, moderate demand, defending his people under threat, who not know at the time the crimes of which he was accused. >> there was no indication anybody was killed. i never on
. the rate slowed for a seventh straight quarter. some analysts point to the debt crisis in europe for dragging down experts. others argue consumers are worried about what they see up ahe ahead. >> china's economy is maintaining a high growth rate and emerging as a key force of the global economy. but the lingering debt programs in europe have taken a toll of the chinese economy. some analysts say the major fracture behind china's throwdown is a sharp drop in its exports of the chinese economy. that as the eurozone debt crisis continues. europe is china's biggest trading partner. consumers are uncertain about the future. chinese premiere warned the country's growth target in march to 7.5%. based on the fact of too fast growth. the level is down from last two years 8%. china apparently hopes to change its economic structure. >> we'll attach more importance to stable growth and keep implementing current policies. we'll adjust industries that are already growing and promote their development. we'll strengthen the foundations of sustainable healthy growth. >> china's central bank has b
talk a little bit about what is happening in europe right now with respect to the european central bank and the central bank in various european countries have been taking action. how does that affect us here? >> we are watching the european situation very carefully. it has been a problem for the u.s. economy. we have seen headwinds coming from slowing trade, slowing economic activity in europe, and the financial stresses tied to europe. that has affected our markets and economy. we have a very strong interest in europe solving its problems. in addition, they have so far avoided any real blowups in the financial system. if that were to happen, that would not be confined to europe. it would be felt around the world and certainly the united states. we have a lot of interest and following that situation. it is a very difficult, complex situation. instead of having a single government, trying to decide how to solve these problems, they have 17 countries in the euro zone, each one with its own parliament and politics. the process of making decisions has been very difficult. the problem, a ve
warning about conditions in europe and china, these are companies that are symbols of american stability, they are worried. so worried that some are laying off workers to cut costs. you remember that move. the problem here is that there's just less money coming into the united states. the candidates aren't talking about the slowdown overseas or the storm that it's fueling, but they claim that they can keep america competitive, create millions of jobs, and cut the deficit. voters understand their big ideas and they like them, but undecided voters aren't sure which guy can turn promises into economic reality. i've got two of the best political minds in the country to break this down for us. candy crowley our chief political correspondent, host of "state of the union with candy crowley" and mark preston, cnn's political director. candy, let's start with you. from the very first primary which you covered to the last hour of voting, the economy has been and will be issue number one. is there anything either candidate can really say or do in the next few days to sway voters who are still not c
fent norcompo ism moved the market up in addition to follow-through from europe. the dow industrials were off the high 2-1 advancing to declining stocks. it was 3-1 earlier but you could see we've dipped a little just in the last 15 minutes or so. in terms of what's moving here, well, right across the board, pretty nice rally here. energy materials, industrials, even consumer staples participating in this rally. we're expecting very significant increase in earnings about 20% over last year. >> that's almost a 4% gain in goldman sachs. >> look at the overall group moving to the up side. we need some positive earnings commentary from this group for the fourth quarter for the s&p to make numbers. finally, airlines are up as the international air transport association talked about a higher profit outlook for the airlines this year. given the prices i've been paying for travel? there ought to be -- >> you're our leading indicator. >> it hurts! >> absolutely. thank you. see you a little bit later. >>> art cashin is also with us on the floor. director of floor operations with ubs financial
of being behind the murder of 8000 men and boys in 1995, the worst massacre in europe since world war ii. prosecutors have now charged 161 suspects over war crimes in the balkans. on tuesday, the final defendant began his child. the former rebel leader was arrested in 2011 after years on the run. he is accused of the murder, torture, and forcible deportation of ethnic croats. >> the creation of ethnically cure territories in regions that have for generations been ethnically mixed is accomplished through conflict, persecution, and violence. what we now generically called ethnic cleansing. >> the united nations war crimes court could take another two years to pass its final judgments. >> we are happy now to be joined in the studio by our east european affairs correspondent, who has been following this trial for us. first of all, how did the defense go down in the court today? >> i think what we see is a two-sided strategy. on the one side, they are trying to say the killings that happen happened in the cause of war and were not human rights violations -- the killings that happens happen in
on growing evidence armstrong had misled the company for more than a decade. >> in europe, with public pressure mounting over the economic environment of cost of biofuels, the european commission announced a major correction in its policies that could eventually see the sector scaled way back. >> commissioners say new proposals out today send out the right signal for the industry, which would have to move onto a new generation of fuel that do not compete with demand for food. >> european energy commissioner and the european commissioner for climate action did not exactly present a united front. they've announced plans to restrict the growth of biofuels. one is pushing for stronger emissions standards for new motor vehicles, while the others concerned about the impact on the automotive industry. >> it is about fairly sharing the burden between the manufacturers of large and small vehicles, and we have to take into account certain interests that will affect how european manufacturers compete in global markets. oetinger has come under fire for a letter he wrote to a car maker in which he
will be released november 2nd. and drought, frost and hail are causing one of the worst years for europe's wine grape harvest in half a century. larry shover of sfg alternatives joins us this morning for a look at the market. larry, what is driving this market? > > right now it seems like it's not earnings, because we saw yesterday, ibm's earnings, they didn't do very well - down 5.5% in the stock, but yet the stock market still rallied. i think it's a broader focus. the european tail risk has gone away. u.s. and china numbers aren't great, but they're stabilizing. so i think people are getting their heads around the fact that things have perhaps bottomed out in the market. > > as you mentioned, ibm was a heavy weight on this market yesterday. could that continue on into today? > > it definitely could, and we'll see earnings coming out later. but right now i think the expectations are so low for the market, and i do believe that most people are looking past quarter three and maybe even quarter four, and i think more people are looking toward china and looking toward europe for where the market
in europe to slow the influx of asylum seekers.% >> and championship league soccer, victories against favored international rivals. thanks for joining us. we start in syria where the military has agreed to a cease- fire over the four-day muslim holiday. >> international peace envoy lackdar brahimi has held talks to mediated truce starting on friday. >> all the one rebel group has rejected the proposal, the united nations hopes it could create the basis for dialogue and a longer lasting peace agreement. >> it is a statement many had been hoping for. an announcement on state television -- declaration confirming a cease-fire is to take effect at midnight -- reads a declaration confirming a cease-fire is to take effect at midnight. smoke and the sounds of fighting visible across what appears to be damascus, but it is not possible to verify when or where the video was recorded. i and other syrian hot spots, fighting continued throughout the day -- in other syrian hot spots. rebels in aleppo say they have taken control of several neighborhoods there. videos like these make scenes like this
in the skies above europe. new proposals for flying rules. they're calling it the greatest comeback in golfing history. a european starter has left the american team stunned. midday in london, 8:00 p.m. in tokyo, where the united nations has published an alarming report about the rapidly aging global population. by 2050 there will be more elderly people than there are under 15 and the vast majority will be in poor countries, those least capable of dealing with the demographic time bomb. japan is one country that is already having to face up to the challenge. >> if the rest of the world wants to see what the future might look like, they need look no further than here in japan. their population is already aging more rapidly than anywhere else in the world. 30% of people here are already over the age of 60. driving from here in tokyo to the countryside, the men and women harvesting the rice are invariably gray-haired. the japanese population is not only aging rapidly, it is also shrinking at an alarming rate. the current population will shrink from 127 million to just 87 million in the next 60 ye
? the market feels no pressure at all. off to the races with good news from europe right now we're up 111 points but look at the nasdaq charging ahead s&p 500 up more than 12. we have until. and we have the cfo. caterpillar and boeing joining at the top pushing the market higher this is a broad-based rally we have traders at the new york stock exchange and chicago mercantile exchange. yes the ceo was ousted but the broad-based raleigh, what are people talking about? >> how the averages just one week ago now the nasdaq broke through with the 50 day moving average and has rallied. liz: to see the jump of 32 points is pretty significant? >> i think so. depending how you look at it that looks like a perfect head and shoulders. now rallying back to the resistance level. the bottom line it is a rising tide rewrite in the sweet spot that is good levying the citi group problem aside the market has always done well we get a backdrop the combination of which pushes them higher. i think there is a lot of bears choking one week ago it looked like they were going the other way. [laughter] liz:he mos p
. >> it comes back to what we were just saying about europe, europe being infected by asia, but if china is supposed to be exporting to europe, then those -- i don't know which one is pushing which. >> obviously there's trade both ways. but what we are seeing are there's some glimmers of hope that the downturn has passed. but against that what we're seeing is more and more companies looking at the outlook, hearing words from people like the imf and saying okay, it's still tough times, let's move back. we've seen this in some of the earnings reports as well. morgan is saying it's not looking great for next year. let's cut back. that's the general mantra at the moment, it seems, globally. >> chris, i think we're going to let you go on that point. chief economist at market. don't forget on today's show, we're going to be in tel aviv, where we're told exclusively that further action is needed on iran. facebook has dispelled fears about its ability to monetize. we'll announcements live from connecticut. volvo has missed estimates it's warned a flat demand. we'll be in stockholm to speak first
open across the board for the s&p, the dow and the nasdaq. taking a look at europe, italy is down by just .10%. a road map develops for what could be a very, very good day in technology. hear what steve ballmer has to say. >>> the mini ipad is out. >>> more trouble at best buy, a major management shakedown. >>> and is cramer going to call this the come back story of the quarter? and could it keep the ceo off the hot seat? >>> we begin today of course with microsoft officially unv l unveiling it's -- the secret staging area microsoft uses to lae out it's retail stores nationwide, we talked to steve ballmer about pcs versus tablets. >> you asked me what's going to happen to the pc market and the tablet market. we can't tell them apart. but with one arrow, we have if you will gotten two birds, tablet and pc, but we don't want to let any of the innovation surface of that not be exploited. that's the only statement we're making. >> what do you think it's going to do? because if there's so much hoopla about windows 8 a year ago. >> it's a dividend play, it's a utility, it's a little mo
bank thug. the question i want to ask, who are you? i never heard of you. nobody in europe had heard of you. i would like to ask you, president, who voted for you? >>neil: years ago seeing the dangers of a european commission, a whole union that we learned is not what it was cracked up to be. the leader of the u.k. independent party, good to have you. who were you addressing, unelected, at yet not sworn in statement. >>guest: that dull man i was talking to with the glasses was not happy. he had just been appointed, and i repeat, "appointed" the president of europe, the president of 500 million people and non-descript bureaucrat. >>neil: he looks like a professor corwy and your point was what? >>guest: my point was, i don't want to live in the united states of europe because i think the europe has different countries, different languages, different histories, but if you were going to build the united states of europe, surely you wouldn't turn the clock back a thousand years and abolish democracy and finish up with a president that had been appointed and who cannot be removed. that was
, the behind-the-scenes go-to person making deals with europe and china. is any progress being made there? and then, penny for his thoughts, details of an exclusive interview with jc penney's ceo, ron johnson. how long before his grand turn around plan shows results? and a bit of a turn around for the markets. are we -- we are down as we come on the air. sue herera, by 60 points? >> that's right, ty, a modest decline. yesterday when we started here, we were up triple digits, today, both the dow and the s & p lower, profit taking perhaps or something more. let's get the trading action here with bob pisani joins me from the floor. i would say it is a little profit taking. we still have a a lot of data points we still have the employment report out on friday and we'd big triple digit advance in the dow. >> very frustrating to say we are still moving on europe. happenness every day makes people crazy, look at the dow jones industrial average, waiting for spain to ask for a bailout request. it is that simple. 11:15, 11:30, the prime minister of spain came caught and said you listen, we are not
the spanish situation, the overall banking situation in europe and to do so for a position of great strength. so, mr. roderigo and see her today, it is great to host you today. we look forward to your remarks. [applause] >> thank you for your very kind presentation. ladies and gentlemen, it is for me a great pleasure of great honor to grace these very distinguished audience and i'm very privileged to participate in this meaning of the foundation. so thank you to you all for being here today. throughout my presentation to concentrate on what i considers the key points because you about the material with you and so you can look at it whenever you think is useful. so i will concentrate in some aspects. first of all, everyone knows and the world there is duality developed and emerging countries. but let's say five business days to understand what is going on in this duality that yesterday for the imf have already underlined how the world is progressing and away the mature economic and economy as we have it pretty sound situation. well, if you compare what is happening in the u.s. in terms of the
don't know what it was to. >> in all seriousness, it is europe. europe is a huge threat to america's financial security. it really is. it didn't come up. i would have loved to have heard romney's answer on that. obama's answer on that. i think there was a problem with the moderator. bring back the female moderator. >> because i don't know anything about europe being a threat. isn't it just china? >> china is part of europe technically. >> i am feeling ignorant, but sweden is a threat? i didn't know this. >> you wreak. >> well that's smelling nice then because wreaking smells like a fart. >> what was missing for you? >> i really like the comedy. i felt like a lot of people like ann coulter said that romney was being nice to the retard, and i thought the right just can't lose gracefully. they knew they were losing, and they had all of these excuses. just lose. you got served. >> all right. who do you think won? >> a slight edge to obama. >> i got obama. >> you know what is weird? i noticed in the beginning an unusual sponsor for this debate. very strange. >> good evening from the cam
peace prize for 2012 is to be awarded to the european union. >> suarez: norway, though in europe, is not a member of the e.u. but its five-member peace prize committee awarded the honor to the 27-nation european union for the "advancement of peace, reconciliation, democracy, and human rights in europe." in brussels, the president of the european commission welcomed the news. >> the nobel peace prize council... committee, and in fact the international community are now sending a very important message to europe-- that the european union is something very precious. that we should cherish it for the good of europeans and indeed for the good of all the world. >> suarez: the first iterations of the e.u. were born in the 1950s, out of the idea that close economic ties could help mend a devastated europe after the second world war. but it's now the economy that has the e.u. facing one of its biggest crises yet. mounting debts, high unemployment, and austerity measures have triggered protests in some euro-zone nations. the economic woes have created deep rifts among countries using the j
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